7 steps to a SAP PI to PO migration

Some time ago I created a webinar about SAP PI to PO migrations. I wanted to use the content and share it because it is quite useful for everybody working on a migration. I can see that it is some of the questions that I got on my latest webinar was also about the process. I do hope that this gives a better understanding of what is happening.

As with all things, there are 7 steps to make a good SAP Migration. So if you are in the process this is the steps that I would recommend that you take. It is assumed that you will migrate to a new system because it will make it easier to migrate a single interface at the time. If things does not work you will always have a backup plan.

The 7 steps are the following:

  1. Goals
  2. Current integrations
  3. Pattern mappings
  4. Resource consumption
  5. Migration phases
  6. Development
  7. Testing

The process should be very iterative because you learn a lot in the process that you can use to migrate other interfaces. I the current integration you are going to map out all your existing interfaces together with what types of pattern they are using. This information will then be used in the migration phase and how it is going you may get input on how the next interfaces can be migrated.

You can view this in two different ways. Either you can watch my Screen recording video of it.

Or view the slides here and download them if you want to be using them.

I have also created a longer article about some of the SAPs you need to consider more in details in the blog SAP XI/PI to PO migration.  It is not the same and the two have a lot in common.

Tool to get BPM context data from a SAP PO BPM

One of the benefits to having a team of developers at your disposal like I do to create my SAP PI/PO test tool is, the ability to create cool applications to solve problems. So I’m really happy that I can give a free tool away to the people that have the same challenge as I ran into.

I have a client where we were using BPM to have some user actions in. Sometimes they wanted to restart the BPM process with the same data or minor changes. I could see the payload in the BPM monitor as on below.

This did not give any information about how I could download the message. I know if the process is failed I’m able to edit the payload of a message, but this is obvious, not true if the process is completed.

There was no API for getting the data from my research at the point.

So we had to create our own tool to handle the queries.

We found the table in the database that housed the Context Data and then started understanding how it worked. The context data was encoded in an XML structure with base64. Then it was just to build a simple user interface on top of it.

It should be easy to find the correct document and so we added a function to make xpath in the data to get the correct data. So we ended up with the following UI.

 

If you want to get it. You can get it for free at http://figaf.com/tools/figaf-bpm-extractor/.

The build includes sources so you can optimize it your self.

 

 

 

 

Retiring the SAP PIDocumenter and Diff tools

I have retired my documentation tools.

The reason is that they used an old form for documentation and SAP PI/PO did no longer support the use of XIM files. It was therefore not as much the tool was used anymore.

I have created a short guide to how you can export your mappings to an Excel sheet with NWDS. I’m not to found of the layout of it but it does support standard and also export UDFs. So it is an easier way to make the documentation.

How to document SAP PI/PO Mappings using NWDS

SAP PRO Support tool update

I know that for a lot of you the support of the SAP PO systems can be a difficult task. If you are a developer, it can become something you dread talking about —  you would prefer spending your time creating new integrations. If you are an integration manager, you probably see that your developers are spending too much time on support and not enough on creating new developments.

The integration landscape is becoming more complex, more difficult to manage, and it also plays a more critical role. What happens if your interfaces are not running for 30 minutes? Will you be able to deliver the products to your customers? What will the impact be?

As a developer, I focused on creating a tool that would allow me spend time on the most critical support issues, and be able to get back to creating new integrations. It can sometimes be daunting to go through all the old issues to find what is going on.

I have created a short video on what Figaf POSupport is about.

I want to give my customers as good an experience as possible, so I am making an introductory offer that will last until December 31.

The price will be just 2500$ per productive system, a 500$ discount.

I’m introducing a Founders club for all the initial users of POSupport. We will have monthly web meetings where we will talk about support, and what best practices are. It will be a way for all members to learn how to make a better support setup.

For the first 5 that purchases, I’ll provide a 1-hour setting up session, where we will go through all the setup steps on your system.

I want to be able to support all new clients, so the deal will be limited to 20 participants only.

What Figaf POSupport can help with:

  • Automate error handling, like cancel, resend or notify business or the ERP system

  • Document error handling, so all developers/supporter workers can help solve issues

  • Give insight into what errors have occurred on your SAP PI/PO system
There is a free 30-day trial that you can install, and see for yourself what the tool can do.

To get started click here. 

SAP PI/PO Learning survey is out

The responses to the survey were finally compiled into a comprehensive report. Reading and interpreting people’s answers were enjoyable activities.SAP PI PO learning survey

I am glad that I can announce the availability of this survey – and the availability of its results. The report can be found at this link: http://picourse.com/learningsurvey/

The survey took place in March 2015. The 139 respondents answered questions related to their career in the field of SAP XI/PI/PO development. They let us take a peek into the beginnings of their careers. These professionals were ready to share the details of their SAP learning experiences. Their answers have clearly shown that a true professional never stops evolving.

There are several methods of learning SAP XI/PI/PO. Most people turn to a course in order to receive the basic information they need, and to understand the platform’s characteristics. Of course, these courses can vary greatly. Some choose standard classroom SAP courses, while others opt for online courses. On the other hand, consulting companies prefer organizing in-house courses.

Another method involves a professional collaboration with a mentor. The guidance of a more experienced developer can make a huge difference in the SAP XI/PI/PO learning process. One of the priorities of the survey was establishing whether sharing ideas with fellow developers can greatly influence the learning process.

Another key aspect that was approached by the survey is the amount of time required by a developer to become completely independent as an SAP professional. The survey has shown that most developers feel confident only after a period of 1-2 years. An SAP course might not be enough by itself – there’s always room for improvement and mentorship is a very good approach to acquiring SAP skills.

Another topic was the issue of continuous learning. I found out that ⅔ of developers review their work, one way or another. That’s quite a large number, and it also correlates with the size of the developer’s organization. The bigger your organization, the more likely it is that you review your solutions.

You can get the report on how people have learned SAP PI here:

http://picourse.com/learningsurvey/